Synthrosis

SYNARTROSES

Fibrous joints include all joints where bone surfaces are almost in direct contact, such as joints between skull bones (except TMJ). There are three main types of fibrous joints:

Sutures

In the sutures the ends of the bones have interdigitations or grooves, which keep them closely and firmly together. Consequently, the connecting fibers are very short filling a small gap between the bones. This type of joint is found only between the flat bones of the skull. At maturity, the suture fibers begin to be completely replaced, those on either side of the suture become tightly joined / fused. This condition is called synostosis.

               Cranial Suture Example              Synostosis (Sacrum) Example
Cranial Suture ExampleSacred Synostosis Example
CRANIAL SUTURES
 Sutures
Source: NETTER, Frank H .. Atlas of Human Anatomy. 2 ed. Porto Alegre: Artmed, 2000.

Syndesmoses Examples Syndesmoses

In these sutures the interposed tissue is also the fibrous connective, but does not occur in the skull bones. In fact, the Anatomical Nomenclature only records two examples: tibio-fibular syndesmosis and radioulnar syndesmosis.

 

 

 

 

Gonfoses

Also called a peg joint, it is a fibrous joint that specializes in fixing teeth in the alveolar cavities in the jaw and jaws. Periodontal collagen joins the dental cementum with the alveolar bone.

 

GONFOSES & #8211; PRIMARY AND PERMANENT TEETH
GONFOSES - PRIMARY AND PERMANENT TEETH
Source: NETTER, Frank H .. Atlas of Human Anatomy. 2 ed. Porto Alegre: Artmed, 2000.